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Writing Prompt: Food Memories

23 June, 2016

Green tomato pie

A couple of weeks ago, at the end of autumn here in the southern hemisphere, a friend collected her unripe tomatoes and gave them to me. Since then, I’ve been making different versions of green tomato pie. (And yes, it’s a dessert, not a savoury dish.)

As I chopped the tomatoes, childhood memories surfaced. My grandmother, knowing it was my favorite pie, always made one if I was staying with her in spring. At the time I took it for granted, but now I treasure it for the loving gesture it was.

Years later, in Australia, I worked on the outskirts of Sydney where market gardeners had their fields. I often bought green tomatoes from an elderly Italian farmer, who kept a roadside vegetable stall. I could tell that he was puzzled when I searched through his tomatoes for the greenest ones. But he didn’t speak English and I didn’t speak Italian.

As a writing prompt, the phrase remembering a food may elicit rich ideas.

Do  you have a pleasant memory about a particular food? Or a bad or scary memory?  Is there food that leads to nostalgia?

Perhaps you remember a hilarious food episode. Or a food ritual, from the past or present. Or a particular food related to a specific place, such as a restaurant or a neighborhood.

Once you select a food to write about, consider if you want to write as if you’re in the past, or in the present reflecting on the past. Or try fiction, perhaps by exaggerating the real-life food experience you had.

One of the writing-about-food pieces I love is Garrison Keillor’s recitation, on his radio program, about sweet corn. He talked so lovingly about this humble food that  I wanted to go out and buy a few ears.

I was amused today to find this additional comment he made about sweet corn:

Sweet corn is our family’s weakness. We were prepared to resist atheistic Communism, immoral Hollywood, hard liquor, gambling, dancing, smoking, fornication, but if Satan had come around with sweet corn, we at least would have listened to what he had to sell.

Fiction, Voice & Vision Make Great Nonfiction

27 May, 2016

TED_Talk_photo_4-330

Voice & VisionStephen J. Pyne’s book  about writing nonfiction, starts with the question: Why do we write?

Many unpublished writers dream of garnering fame and fortune. Pyne doesn’t think these aims provide a practical impetus for writing. He suggests  the real trigger for writing  is the desire to connect with readers, by entertaining them, helping them understand a topic, or providing some type of fulfillment.

If you have a great topic, that’s good—but it’s not enough. Many people have an idea that could be developed into a book-length manuscript. But few end up with a finished manuscript. Why?

According to Pyne, some simply don’t have time to write. I’d add that some don’t make the time to write. Others lack the motivation, skills, or knowledge to develop their ideas in terms of creating a major writing project.

Even writers who succeed in finishing a manuscript may hit a brick wall when it comes to publication. One can self-publish. But if the idea is to get an agent or publisher, it’s worth knowing that manuscripts flood in to these gatekeepers, increasing ‘arithmetically’, but they ‘die exponentially’. In other words, only a small percentage of writers get their work turned into a book, by a publishing house.

Putting all that aside, how can nonfiction writers improve their chances by improving their writing?

Draw on fiction elements

Utilising fiction elements when writing nonfiction is increasingly popular. A few years ago, the term creative nonfiction was relatively unknown, but it is now a popular category.

Whatever your topic and take, can you include the following fictional elements in your material?

  • A strong plot
  • A narrative arc
  • Memorable characters
  • Vividly described settings and scenes
  • Action and narrative
  • An effective tone and rhythm

Identify voice 

Voice is how an author relates to readers and tries to keep them reading. An author’s voice is made up of three major writing elements.

  • Word choice
    Formal or informal?  What suits your expected readers?
  • Sentence and paragraph structure
    Are your sentences and paragraphs usually long, or short? Informal, or formal? Simple, or complex? Does this structure suit your readers and your topic?
  • Tone
    What is your attitude towards your subject? Towards your expected readers?

    When I read Bill Bryson’s  A Walk in the Woods, I so much enjoyed how he told his tale of hiking the Appalachian Trail that I went on to read his other books. But I tend give up on a nonfiction book if the author writes more than a general reader needs to know, seems egotistical, or goes off on confusing tangents.

Identify your vision

What Pyne calls vision is I call themeIt’s the writer’s big idea, the organising principle that helps writers shape their topic. Once you know your theme, you’ll find it easier to make choices, in terms of material that supports versus material that does not.

Pyne likens vision to a sheepdog that ‘keeps your flock together’ and reminds you ‘where to go next, how long to stay, what to keep, what to discard’.

How do you choose your vision? He suggests focusing on topic and purpose.
Topic:  What do you want to do? What is your book going to be about?
Purpose:  Why?

If you cannot get a clear sense of your topic and purpose, the what and the why, it may help if you consider where your finished book would be placed. 

  • Where would readers find your book, in relevant bookshops, libraries, and websites?
  • What other books would be on the shelf with your book? How do they differ from your book? How are they similar?
  • If someone asks what genre or category your book fits, how would you answer?

Later, when drafting, keep returning  to these questions. As you read and research more, you may become more specific in terms of your topic and purpose.

Interestingly, Pyne believes that if writers keep their focus on voice and vision, they won’t suffer the dreaded writer’s block. How good is that!

 

Pyne, Stephen J. (2009). Voice & Vision: A guide to writing history and other serious nonfiction. Cambridge Massachusetts: Harvard UP.

Map First, THEN Draft

15 May, 2016

Mapping—sometimes called clustering, ballooning, or bubbling—encourages writers to play with ideas before creating their first draft.

The aim of mapping is to be loose—exploring ideas and making connections, without restriction. Mapping helps writers generate more ideas at the start. Later, they can sort through the results to work out which are worth developing.

The main benefit of mind-mapping is that the exercise often takes a writer beyond obvious ideas and into new creative territory. It’s fun, and satisfying, to follow where your mind takes you.

Here is a visual of what a mapping exercise may look like when finished.  This example is from Scapple, a good, inexpensive, online mapping program. I use it, but many writers are happy to map using a sheet of paper and a pen.

Start mapping

If you have never tried mapping to develop material–short story, essay, speech, whatever—why not have a go?

When mapping, let your mind free associate. Imagine you decide to  start with the term crazy love.  Jot it down in the middle of your paper, and circle it.

Now, what does the term bring to mind? Capture the first idea that pops into your head:  Write it down, circle it, and draw a line to link  it to crazy love. 

Keep going, adding words and circles. Some circles will have their own offshoots as you think of additional ideas.

At the end of the exercise, your sheet of paper will be filled with a network of circles and lines, words and phrases.

Example
Sarah wants to write  a poem about home. She writes the wor HOME in the centre of her page, and draws a circle around it.  Then she free associates, adding whatever words and phrases come to mind. She does not censor anything, no matter how silly, but lets her imagination run.

When she thinks she has done enough, she puts her mind-map of HOME aside. Later,  when she returns to her map, she not only has lots of material, but she may now have a better sense of which items on her page could work for her. The exercise has taken her beyond her first ideas.

Starting now

If you haven’t used mapping as a playful pre-drafting activity, have a go. Imagine writing a short story, poem, essay etc. on one of these topics:

  • Early memory
  • Scar
  • Great
  • When I was young
  • Not again
  • Conflict
  • If only
  • I need

Place your word or phrase in the centre of your page. Then start adding words and phrases as they come to mind. Work quickly. Don’t censor or evaluate.

As you work, add connecting lines, to show relationships. The aim is to work quickly, creating a web of words and phrases. You may opt to leave some terms on their own. With other terms, you may come up with more connections. For these, use linking lines to new circles.

When  you have reached a finishing point, put the results aside for at least a few hours, and don’t think about the exercise.

When you return to your map, shift into editor mode. Assess what you want to keep. Perhaps you’ll get a sense of where you want to go with the material. Highlighter pens can be useful here. Use one colour to identify possible main points and another colour for secondary points. Or one colour for items you definitely want to include,  and another colour for items you might add. Or start by crossing out the items you don’t want to include.

Once you’ve assessed your mapping results, You can refer to it when developing an outline, if that’s how you start writing. Or perhaps you will start drafting, given that you now have a better sense of your topic and what you wish to include.

 

10 Fixes to Create Amazing Short Stories

20 March, 2016

A novel is a daily labor over a period of years. But a story can be like a mad, lovely visitor, with whom you spend a rather exciting weekend.  —Lorrie Moore

A jet pack wearing hero on the cover of Amazin...
Amazing Stories, Aug. 1928. (Wikipedia)

Unfortunately, some stories suggest more of the mad rather than the lovely. What problems can wreck your short story’s pace and content?

This checklist can help you evaluate your material when you’re drafting, as well as later, when editing.

Problem 1: Writing beyond your story’s true start and true ending

Missing your story’s true beginning and ending can play havoc with pace and sense of closure. When you’re grappling with writing, it can be hard to identify the appropriate point to start and finish. Some writers load unnecessary information at the front. Some keep going, past the logical ending, as they keep explaining or tying up loose ends.

Unlike novels, short stories often leave some elements unexplored and unreported. When writing short, try to remain open, rather than explain too much.

Problem 2:  Overkilling your scenes
A similar problem is overkill, taking a scene past its dramatic peak.
What if you want a scene to peak when your main character confronts a workplace bully.
Start the build up too early and your readers may think the peak has come too late. If you Write too much afterwards, extending the scene, and they may not grasp where the peak point is.

Problem 3:  Repeating too often
A story that is too repetitive can annoy readers. They may think the author believes they’re stupid or can’t pay attention.

Even a small slip can irritate. If a character  introduces her pet as  my dog Jack, readers expect it to be shortened after that to Jack. If Jack’s owner has a hyena laugh,  readers don’t need that descriptor each time she reacts to something funny.

Problem 4:  Disclosing too early or too much
Modern short fiction often does not include a lot of detail about characters—their history  or backstory, their views about various topics. There simply isn’t that much story space to add extraneous details. Having a character provide too much personal history can overload a short story.

In real life, we usually share our personal details gradually, depending on what and how much we are comfortable telling. Think of how little information we provide when we meet someone new. When chatting with old friends, we may keep to familiar, accepted topics rather than introduce new ones.

Problem 5:  Inserting useless flashbacks
A flashback has a use. Done well, it helps readers understand the story. If it doesn’t provide this payoff, get rid of it, or find a different way to provide the information you want readers to know.

Imagine that you don’t want to use a major flashback when your character is reflecting on a haunting childhood tragedy. What can you do instead?

  • Make one flashback into a few shorter flashbacks, interspersed throughout your story. Your character could experience the tragedy several times, with different details coming to the surface each time
  • Replace the flashback with dialogue. Your character could tell another character about the incident. Discussion not only provides another’s view , plus it can flesh out both characters.

Problem 6:  Confusing divine art or reality as FICTION  
When writing the first messy draft, it’s fine to follow the flow of inspiration. But don’t mistake the result as a divine gift from the writing gods, meaning that no revision is needed.

If you want to fictionalise a real event, more is needed than changing the names of those involved. And probably every critique group focused on fiction has had someone respond to feedback with this defence:   But I wrote it exactly the way it really happened.

Even if you draw on divine inspiration, or a real-life account, test your story’s  fictional payload. How? Put your draft aside. Let it go cold. Then analyse each scene in terms of its fictional power.

1) Does this scene help my story overall? In what way? How much? Can I do better?
2) Does it help readers understand? What do they understand now that they didn’t before?
3) Would removing this scene weaken the story? Why? How?

Problem 7:  Writing unnecessary dialogue
A story’s pace and interest can be jeopardised by lengthy dialogue, especially if the topic is trivial. Example:  Readers learn that the main character has organised to take vengeance on her cheating partner. Next, she meets up with an old friend, and they chat for ages about work issues.

The problem is not that this conversation couldn’t happen in real life. But after getting readers focused on vengeance, office politics is a letdown. When writing dialogue relevant to the main plot, provide the weighting and space it deserves. pare back the dialogue.

Problem 8: Adding too many non-crucial details
Include too many minor events or details, and you may drown your story. And if minor items overwhelm major ones, your readers may become confused or bored. How much do you want readers to know at the different stages in your story?

To evaluate what’s important and what isn’t,  keep asking why. Why was Sam at the deli that Thursday? Why did James look scared when the phone rang?  You don’t have to explain everything to your readers. But working out the answers can help you identify your story’s mix of important and non-crucial elements. This exercise may also help you follow the famous writing advice:  Kill your darlings. 

Problem 9:  Creating clutter characters
These characters are minor, and almost invisible—unless you give them too much oxygen. You know you have a problem when a reader tells you how much she likes Sharon, the nurse’s aide, because she’s sooo funny. Unfortunately, Sharon has only six lines of dialogue in one scene and never appears again.

Problem 10: Incorporating dream scenes
When I wrote my first story in a beginners writing class, I included a dream scene. I thought it was so expressive. But the workshop leader looked pained. Since then, I’ve read or heard from other writing experts, who often advise jettisoning the dream scene. Why?

Sometimes, a dream scene has to carry too much weight. Example: using the dream to tell readers something crucial in understanding the story. Sometimes a dream is fluff, which does not pull its weight in terms of moving the story forward.

If you must incorporate that crazy dream you’ve thought up, at least clarify its purpose. What do you want your readers to get from it in terms of the overall story? Then consider alternatives to a dream, and decide what works best.

Prompt: Women of Letters

13 March, 2016
painting 'Newspapers, Letters and Writing Impl...

Painting:  ‘Newspapers, Letters and Writing Implements on a Wooden Board’ (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

These days, I so rarely get ‘here comes the postman’ letters that it seems odd to comment on writing letters. However, the Women of Letters is unusual, a popular ‘talk letters’ event.

Selected women—usually well-known to the public—are given a set topic and  respond to it in a form of a letter. Each woman can choose who or what the receiver is, plus whether that recipient is from the past, present or future. At a WoL event, each invited woman reads out her piece before a live audience.

The topics selected for these events work well as writing prompts. See what you can do with the following.

For an added challenge, imagine you’ve been invited to read your letter at a WoL event. Consider what and how to develop your piece to connect with a diverse audience. Will your letter be funny, poignant, angry, revealing? Will you draw on real life events or provide a fantasy?

Here are a some topics. I’ve included questions to help you reflect on what you could include and what approach you could take to develop your idea:

  • A complaint letter
    Is it from the past, present, or future? Is it funny or serious? About a person, animal, or an object?
  • To my most treasured possession
    Was it from the past—your own or someone else’s? Is the perspective about the possession unusual?
  • To the moment I knew it was time to go home
    Was it related an interesting period/job/phenomenon in your life? About a particular day? Can you do something with the word home? Was there a turning point, e.g., a decision made, an action taken?
  • A love letter
    Are you writing to your younger self? To a relative? An animal?  A physical condition? A habit? A location? Is it to do with something now gone, vanished? Or something you’ve learned or unlearned?
  • To the things I never told my mother
    What were the circumstances surrounding the ‘not telling’? What do you think now about not telling? Are the things never told funny? Tragic? Or . . .?
  • An apology
    Is this about a change of some sort? A sarcastic response to a irritating person or thing? Is to do with a misfortunate or confusing event from the past?  Are you writing to your younger self?

MORE PROMPTS

  1. To my most treasured possession
  2. To the person I never got over
  3. To the best day of my life
  4. The letter I wish I had written
  5. To the best present I ever received
  6. To my ghosts
  7. To my turning point
  8. To the thing I can’t resist
  9. To the night I’d rather forget
  10. To the life I could have lived
  11. To my first pin-up
  12. To my nemesis
  13. To the host of that party
  14. To my first boss
  15. To the best decision I ever made
  16. To the song/story I wish I had written
  17. To the person I misjudged
  18. To my twelve-year-old self [or pick any age]
  19. To the moment it all fell apart
  20. To the photo I wish had never been taken
  21. To my most treasured possession
  22. To the one who changed my life
  23. To a little white lie

Source: Marieke Hardy and Michaela McGuire, 2012. https://www.penguin.com.au/products/9780670076093/women-lettersher adventures in the art of correspondence from Women of Letters. Viking Press (Penguin Grp), Melbourne.

 

Shaken & Stirred by a Poetry Reading

14 February, 2016

Where I live, up in the mountains, I usually find that when I’m driving along the highway I’ll pass a loooong coal train snaking next to the road. It’s a line of ugliness because each coal hopper is usually tagged by aerosol vandals, creating a monotonous frieze of contorted letters.

Aerosol mural painters  are a huge step up in terms of art and beauty. In the upper mountain town of Katoomba, some of these artists were invited to create murals along an alleyway. Their work turned a forgotten passageway into a colourful art walk. Katoomba also has other large art pieces on the external walls of buildings, bringing colour to its main street.

A friend sent this photo of a street mural in Charlotte, North Carolina.

I’d love to see more public places where visual art is combined with poetry. To have poems infiltrate public spaces—shaking us awake, reminding us that there’s more to life than the humdrum of shopping, picking up library books, looking for a parking space.

Loves comes quietly

The verse in the photo is by Robert Creeley. He was the first poet I heard reading his own work out loud. As an English major at uni, I was immersed in American and British poetry from Anglo-Saxon times to the 19th century. I also bought slim volumes  of contemporary poets. But I’d never had the opportunity to hear a poet reading their own material to a live audience.

Robert Creeley, from the 1970 Buffalonian (Uni...

Robert Creeley, 1970 Buffalonian, the U. Buffalo student yearbook. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

So when I saw a flyer on campus advertising a public reading by Creeley, I went to see what it was about.

When he came out on stage, looking quite ordinary, I was a little disappointed. He didn’t look like a poet, I remember thinking.

There was no discussion, no interview. He simply adjusted his microphone and began reading. And it was wonderful.

Later, part-way through one poem, he broke off. He explained that he hadn’t read it ‘correctly’, and he started again, a few lines back. He must have felt he’d nailed it that time because he continued to the end.

Why do I remember Creeley’s mistake? His action—stopping, correcting—identified that he emotionally owned that poem. And that its precision, its rightness, was important. To him obviously, but in some flattering way, to us his listeners, people he’d most likely never see again.

That experience of being in an audience that was being read to left me shaken and stirred, and I began reading more poetry and writing some myself.

Even now I enjoy the poem a day app, although I wish it included voice as well as text. I don’t like every poem I read, but The best ones show me a new, different perspective, at least for a few minutes.

What is Conscious Writing?

8 February, 2016
Scene: Maulvi in Meditation
Maulvi in Meditation (Wikipedia)

When I recently came across a book titled Conscious Writing, I was intrigued to know what that meant.

Its author, Julia McCutchen, founded the International Assoc. of Conscious & Creative Writers (IACCW) to help writers who are interested in spiritual and personal development. Her book combines mindfulness exercises and visualisation as part of writing.

Much of the book isn’t relevant to my writing interests. But I was taken with her views about how to begin a major writing project, such as a book.

  • Even if we have a great idea for a book, we may lack confidence about how to develop it. As well, our infamous inner critic can get revved up, to the point that we may despair, thinking  I’m not good enough . . . I can’t write . . . I’m not a real writer.

It is this lack of confidence that makes it hard for writers to

  • keep track of their aims
  • develop their ideas
  • establish an appropriate voice

McCutchen suggests that writers undertake two preparatory steps before embarking on a major writing project:

  1. Start a regular meditation practice
  2. Assess topic, aim, and readers.

Meditating
She believes that establishing an ongoing meditation practice leads to calmness and clarity. Developing these positive qualities can help us counter the fears and confusions we often face when we write. With practice, we may even  quash our inner critic.

Assessing  early

The authors of some how-to books on writing assume that their readers have already settled on theri topic and approach. The books focus on helping these writers develop and improve their material and writing style.

McCutchen believes writers benefit when they undertake a  preliminary step, which involves responding to two questions—Why and Who.

  1. Why?

    Why have I decided  to write about this topic? 
    Why am I passionate about it? What message do I want to convey? What do I want to share with my readers—and why? What’s motivating me to share?

  2. Who?

    Who am I writing for?
     What are my readers’ interests and needs? What kind of experience do I want them to have from reading my ideas, insights, and stories?  What kind of link or relationship would I like to make with them through my book?

What’s the value of considering these two questions? Whatever we write, it’s impossible to engage every reader.  So why not focus, identifying our ideal or most probable readers?

Answering the two questions can help us plan a writing project that focuses on–

  • the readers who are likely to be attracted to and appreciate our ideas
  • the kind of relationship we want with them.

How we answer these two questions provides direction, which can help us as we choose and develop content, structure and message.

McCutchen encourages writers to keep a record of their what and who responses. Some people list them, others use mind-mapping. Having a physical record enables writers to keep evaluating their initial responses. Some may find they can hone their original responses and get a clearer sense of their intent and readership.

 

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